Movie Diary 9/27/2010

Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (Paul Mazursky, 1969). The Port Townsend Film Festival happened last weekend, and the special guest was Dyan Cannon; her tribute evening (yrs. truly acting as moderator) began with a screening of this movie. Gee, it holds up well. More about it later, perhaps. Cannon was an excellent guest, articulate and warm, and anyone hosting her for dinner should know that she really likes roasted eggplant.

Number One (Dyan Cannon, 1977). As an impromptu part of the PTFF, Cannon brought her Oscar-nominated short film (40 minutes long) to screen. It’s a pretty remarkable film about childhood – nobody could/would make it today because of its frankness – and its empathy for the kid-mindset (and the way adults have amnesia about childhood) is complete. If it had subtitles and had been made by a young French director instead of a Hollywood bombshell, it would probably have led to a substantial directing career. (Trivia: this was photographed by Frederick Elmes the same year he did Eraserhead.)

Obselidia (Diane Bell, 2010). And this was the winner of the festival’s Best Narrative Feature prize, an odd and mostly charming little thing about a man compiling an encyclopedia of the obsolete, and the woman who pursues him. The indie-quirk is kept to a tolerable ratio.

Cell 211 (Daniel Monzon, 2009). Gets into a few unlikely plot developments after its first hour, but this prison-riot picture keeps the screws turned reasonably well. (full review 10/1)

The Sting (George Roy Hill, 1973). It was on TV during a lull, and I really hadn’t seen it since it came out. Some things are better left to fond adolescent memory. Scott Joplin rules.

The Social Network (David Fincher, 2010). A film that takes the zeitgeist by the very neck and writes the story of our time large across the epoch….nah, it’s just an entertaining movie. (full review 10/1)