Home Yesterday (This Week’s Movies)

yesterday

Himesh Patel: Yesterday (Universal Pictures)

Links to my reviews published this week in the Herald.

Yesterday. “A big part of why the movie stays enjoyable is that instead of watching a movie star play an unknown, you’re watching an unknown play an unknown.”

Annabelle Comes Home. “This movie revels in the haunted house conventions of people entering basements and opening forbidden doors.”

Ophelia. “Succeeds neither as potboiler nor as quasi-Shakespeare.”

No Scarecrow blog post this week.

Movie Diary 6/25/2019

Yesterday (Danny Boyle, 2019). The only man in the world who remembers Beatles songs (thanks to a global sci-fi whatsis, or possibly a head injury) wrestles with his newfound fame. Let’s just say there’s much more Richard Curtis in this movie than Lennon-McCartney. And one particular plot turn will either strike you as eerily moving or utterly tasteless. (full review 6/28)

Movie Diary 6/24/2019

Midsommar (Ari Aster, 2019). There’s nothing like bright-lit, outdoorsy horror to fill up a summer’s eve. Aster’s Hereditary is a movie that expanded in my head for a long time after I saw it; I’m not sure this one will do the same, although this guy does know how to see his way through movies. (full review 7/3)

The Mystery of Kaspar Hauser (Werner Herzog, 1974). Herzog’s richest and most unpredictable film, buoyed by the ineffable presence of Bruno S. and a gallery of striking faces.

The Long Goodbye (Robert Altman, 1973). A periodic re-visit to this deceptively shambling Raymond Chandler adaptation, which nails its moment in time. Elliott Gould’s Marlowe aside, the film’s case against ugly masculinity – this is a movie about men who hit women – is remarkably complete.

Last Toy (This Week’s Movies)

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Jimmie Fails, Jonathan Majors: The Last Black Man in San Francisco (A24)

Links to my reviews published this week in the Herald, and etc.

Toy Story 4. “Keanu Reeves gives his greatest performance.”

The Last Black Man in San Francisco. “This movie is all about casting a spell.”

For my Seasoned Ticket entry at the Scarecrow Video blog this week, I look back in Toy Story history.

Movie Diary 6/19/2019

Annabelle Comes Home (Gary Dauberman, 2019). Yet another installment of the Conjuring universe that plays fair by old-fashioned haunted-house rules. First-time director Dauberman is not without a fair amount of visual savvy. (full review 6/27)

Jules and Jim (Francois Truffaut, 1962). One of the movies that turned the light switch on for me. Truffaut may have wondered aloud whether cinema or life was the more important, but he serves up equal portions in abundance here.

Movie Diary 6/17/2019

Peter Ibbetson (Henry Hathaway, 1935). A strange film, very self-consciously poetic and romantic, with Gary Cooper and Ann Harding as childhood neighbors who meet, passionately, later in life. Charles Lang executes the gorgeous photography.

Experiment Perilous (Jacques Tourneur, 1944). Tourneur’s skills make one want to give this the benefit of the doubt, but it is an extremely bizarre enterprise. Stolid George Brent meets a giddy old bat (Olive Blakeney) on a train in 1903, which leads (except it doesn’t, actually) him to knowing her brother (creeped-up Paul Lukas) and his younger wife (Hedy Lamarr, as though concussed). Vaguely gothic doings happen, with much connective tissue seemingly missing. Pretty thoroughly baffling throughout.

Movie Diary 6/16/2019

On the Waterfront (Elia Kazan, 1954). It plays very much of its time, and in fact it must have been something to see in ’54. The drama is never less than high, and Kazan’s moves are shrewd and calculated – not a put-down, just a description. Brando comes up with a series of piercing moments, a kind of desperation that fits his character.

A Report on the Party and Guests (Jan Nemec, 1966). From the Czech New Wave, an ultra-weird allegory about a group of folks in the countryside who are confronted by authoritarian figures – or at least a group of people bossing them around. How easily compliant the guests are, how eager to obey. The film has one of the most annoying creatures (I mean this as a compliment) in all of cinema in form of the smug, childish tormentor played by Jan Klusák, generally a composer. Also, has anybody connected this movie with the “folk horror” craze? Because it fits in pretty well.