Hateful Home Carol-ing (This Week’s Movies)

hateful

Samuel L. Jackson, The Hateful Eight

Links to my reviews published this week in the Herald and Seattle Weekly, and etc.

The Hateful Eight. “A slyly anti-romantic Western by a filmmaker who loves Westerns.” (In case of Herald paywall, Weekly link here.)

Carol. “The twist on Brief Encounter is that these characters do not have to be martyred on the altar of propriety.” (Weekly link here.)

Concussion. “Respectable to the point of stuffiness.” (Weekly link here.)

Daddy’s Home. “Ferrell hasn’t exhausted the comedy of emasculation just yet.” (Weekly link here.)

And a Weekly list of Ten Best for 2015; slightly longer version appears in the Herald.

Here’s the list, in short:

  1. 45 Years
  2. Son of Saul
  3. Bridge of Spies
  4. Experimenter
  5. It Follows
  6. Clouds of Sils Maria
  7. Ex Machina
  8. The Assassin
  9. Spotlight
  10. The Duke of Burgundy

At the Overlook Podcast, Steve Scher and I find four essential things to note about Star Wars: The Force Awakens; listen here.

2014 Ten Best Movies (and etc.)

L'Air de Panache: Ralph Fiennes in The Grand Budapest Hotel

L’Air de Panache: Ralph Fiennes in The Grand Budapest Hotel

Links to my reviews published this week in the Herald and Seattle Weekly, and etc.

Winter Sleep. “How small incidents can open up an entire world.” (In case of Herald paywall, Weekly version here.)

Rocks in My Pockets. “It’s a rare movie that makes you want to check in on how the filmmaker is doing since completing the project.” (Weekly version here.)

And a top-ten list for 2014, for Seattle Weekly. For the Herald, there’s also a ten worst. Click on the links for details, but here’s the ten:

1. The Grand Budapest Hotel (Wes Anderson)

2. Only Lovers Left Alive (Jim Jarmusch)

3. Under the Skin (Jonathan Glazer)

4. Two Days, One Night (Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne)

5. Boyhood (Richard Linklater)

6. Blue Ruin (Jeremy Saulnier) and The Rover (David Michôd)

8. Force Majeure (Ruben Östlund)

9. The Homesman (Tommy Lee Jones)

10. Edge of Tomorrow (Doug Liman)

There’s more Top Ten excavation at the 2014 Critics Wrap, where the discussion involves Jim Emerson, Richard T. Jameson, Kathleen Murphy, and me. It has one more broadcast on the Seattle Channel on Saturday January 3 at 9 p.m., and is watchable online here.

At the Overlook Podcast, Steve Scher and I talk about The Interview, does have some laughs and some political satire, layered in amid the raunch. Listen here.

I dropped by KIRO radio’s “Mark Rahner Show” again last week, where we talked about The Gambler and Into the Woods and other stuff. Listen here.

Movie Diary 1/2/2014

The 2013 Critics Wrap, held at the Frye Art Museum, is about to debut on the Seattle Channel. This might’ve been the best Critics Wrap we’ve had, so do please give it a look. Thanks to the Frye, to Shannon Gee and everybody at Seattle Channel, and to panelists Kathleen Murphy, Jim Emerson, and Andrew Wright for a great evening.

The local broadcast debuts tonight (Thursday Jan. 2) at 8:30 p.m., and repeats a buncha times for the next 10 days. Here’s the schedule. Seattle Channel is frequently found on channel 21 hereabouts, but you never know about these things.

Or you can just watch it the old-fashioned way, online. Go here and do that.

 

 

Her Wolf Secret (Weekly Links)

Joaquin Phoenix, enjoying a day at the beach with Her.

Joaquin Phoenix, enjoying a day at the beach with Her.

Links to reviews I wrote this week for the Herald and Seattle Weekly, and etc.

The Wolf of Wall Street. “All this sound and fury falls short.”

Her. “This is a movie of breathtaking design and conventional ideas.”

The Secret Life of Walter Mitty. “You can feel the movie straining to be something special.”

Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom. “The self-imposed tip-toeing required in the Great Man school of moviemaking.”

Grudge Match. “Doesn’t offend, although it rarely comes to life, either.”

Oh, and it’s Ten Best time, isn’t it? Here’s that article, with best and worst included.

Ten Best of Promised Miserables Unchained (Weekly Links)

Waltz and Foxx, unchained

Waltz and Foxx: They’ve got spurs that djingle djangle djingle

Links to reviews I wrote this week for the Herald, and much etc.

Django Unchained. “One walks away reeling from the audacity of it all.”

Les Misérables. “An emotional breakdown in almost every song.”

Parental Guidance. “Cranky.”

Promised Land. “The script isn’t able to disguise how thin its actual story is.”

And a Ten Best of 2012, which will also get its own post, to line up with all the other Best of Year lists on this site. Apologies that this one from the Herald eventually arranges itself in a click-click-click slideshow.

Speaking of, the Seattle Channel has posted the 2012 Critics Wrap from earlier this month; it’s about 90 minutes of movie-year conversation between Jim Emerson, Kathleen Murphy, and myself. The program will also be broadcast in the Seattle area (usually channel 21) a number of times over the next week.

The Broadcast Film Critics Association has announced it list of nominees, which you can read here; the winners have yet to be voted on by those of us in the group, but the 18th annual Critics Choice nods will be awarded at the ceremony on January 10th on the CW Network at 8 p.m. ET/PT.

And on KUOW’s “Weekday” this week, I talked with Steve Scher about – whaddya know? – the best movies of 2012. The session is archived here.

And at long last, Seattle’s history museum, the Museum of History and Industry, is re-opening in its new location at South Lake Union. MOHAI’s first Special Exhibit is “Celluloid Seattle: A City at the Movies,” for which I served as curator. The exhibit looks at Seattle as a place imagined by movies, and also the ways Seattle has gone to the movies over the years. The museum opens Saturday December 29. Read more about the exhibit here. I will give a curator’s talk on January 10, more info here. The show plays through September 8, so please join us sometime in the next eight months.

 

2011 Ten Best Movies

Oldman's Smiley: TTSS

And we wrap up 2011 with another list, this one for the Herald. Read the story here.

The actual lists of best (and worst!) are arranged as a slideshow, so you have to do a lot of clicking. I know – ugh. Sorry! I will shortly post the list here in simple-to-read order.

In the interests of un-asked-for completism, and to gather them all in one post for my Year-by-Year Best Movies category tab, here are other Ten Best tangents:

Video of the Critics Wrap at the Frye Art Museum (Kathleen Murphy, Jim Emerson, Andrew Wright and meself talking about the movies of 2011).

A KUOW “Weekday” session with Richard T. Jameson, Kathleen Murphy, and yours truly, on the best of ’11. Hosted by Steve Scher.

My ballot for Indiewire’s poll, and their overall results.

No new reviews for the Herald this week, and no new KUOW session either. In other words, a typical last-week-of-December pause in the onslaught.

At What a Feeling!, catch up on Eighties-ness with vintage reviews of Ken (King Frat) Wiederhorn’s Meatballs Part II, and John G. Avildsen’s Happy New Year. The latter allows a tip of the hat to the late Peter Falk, and some sort of sideways chance to ring in the new year. Thanks for reading The Crop Duster, and I’ll see you in 2012.

Best of 2010 (Weekly Links)

Tahar Rahim, A Prophet

As always, a slow week for new openings; but I wrote these for the Herald:

Best movies of 2010. Which also includes the worst.

Made in Dagenham. “Artificially inflated by pop songs and cutesy mannerisms.”

And more best of 2010: On KUOW’s “Weekday,” I talk with Steve Scher about the list. Listen to the archived version here; the movie bit kicks in at the 14:00 point.

You can watch the abridged version of the Critics Wrap 2010, in which an esteemed panel sorts the movies of the year. It’s broadcast today on the Seattle Channel (channel 21 in Seattle) at 1 p.m. or 5 p.m., or New Year’s Day at 1 p.m.; or just watch the thing online.

Indiewire did their critics’ poll, with results here; my ballot, too.

Today’s movie at my other website, What a Feeling!: Drugstore Cowboy. Other postings this week at the ever-growing swamp of 1980s movie-ness include the Two Coreys in Dream a Little Dream and Charles Bronson in Messenger of Death.

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