The Friday 4/16/2021

Poitier/Belafonte

Skipping a week on my contribution to the Scarecrow blog. Instead:

I am hosting a radio show. That’s right, not a podcast, a radio show. Produced by Voice of Vashon, it’s called “The Music and the Movies,” a weekly emanation in which I look at different ways music has informed film. Each show stays online for two weeks after its initial Sunday-night (7 p.m. Pacific Time) broadcast. Right now you can listen to my latest episode, on music related to the films of Sidney Poitier and Harry Belafonte; and the previous one, about Bernard Herrmann’s music for fantasy/sci-fi films. On Sunday, that one disappears, and we debut a show about this year’s Oscar nominees for Best Score.

Tomorrow, Saturday 4/17, join us online at 2 p.m. Pacific Time for Scarecrow Academy, where we wind up our ten-week semester on “The Art in Noir: Film Noir and the Director.” We’ll discuss Robert Aldrich’s Kiss Me Deadly this time. Go to Scarecrow Academy and sign up for the free Zoom session, and do it now. Meantime, I introduce the movie here:

I’ve got more vintage 80s reviews at my other website, What a Feeling!, specifically: Jeff Bleckner’s White Water Summer, with Kevin Bacon tormenting Sean Astin in a teen Deliverance; Alex Cox’s Walker, a punk true-story Western with Ed Harris as the Oliver North of his day; Simon Langton’s The Whistle Blower, with Michael Caine in a spy picture; David Leland’s Wish You Were Here, which introduced Emily Lloyd in a widely heralded performance; and Carl Reiner’s Summer School, starring Mark Harmon as a laid-back teacher.

The Friday 4/9/2021

My piece for the Scarecrow blog this week, and etc.

A SIFF “What I Want to See” article.

Tomorrow, Saturday 4/10, join us at 2 p.m. Pacific Time for a free Zoom session in Scarecrow Academy. Our “Art in Noir: Film Noir and the Director” series continues with a discussion of Joseph Losey’s The Prowler, a flat-out amazing film from 1951. Go to the Academy page to register. Here, I speak of the film:

Have you listened to my new radio show yet? I am hosting the program “The Music and the Movies,” a look at how music and film come together, with a different theme each week. Episode #1 is about Burt Bacharach, and will disappear from the website at end-of-day Saturday, so listen now. Ep. #2 is about Bernard Herrmann’s fantasy and sci-fi films. Check back on Sunday for the new one, which considers music from the films of Sidney Poitier and Harry Belafonte.

At my other website, What a Feeling!, I corral a few vintage 1980s reviews on: Prince’s Sign o’ the Times, his musical recovery from Under the Cherry Moon; Claude Berri’s Jean de Florette, a huge French smash starring Yves Montand and Gerard Depardieu; Jill Godmilow’s Waiting for the Moon, a consideration of Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas; Leonard Nimoy’s Three Men and a Baby, a gigantic box-office hit with the Selleck/Guttenberg/Danson juggernaut.

30 Minutes to Nowhere (Weekly Links)

Toy guns and manboys, 30 Minutes or Less

Links to reviews I wrote for the Herald this week, and etc.

Road to Nowhere. “Hellman still has an enormous amount of directing ‘touch.'”

30 Minutes or Less. “Overly reliant on the usual tropes.”

Final Destination 5. “A tremendous argument in favor of a jobs program involving infrastructure.”

On KUOW’s “Weekday,” I talk with Steve Scher about a handful of 2011 movie centenaries: Bernard Herrmann, Lucille Ball, Nicholas Ray, Ronald Reagan, with exit music from Nino Rota. It’s archived here; the movie bit kicks in at the 14-minute mark, with a cross-fade from “Let’s All Go to the Lobby” to Vertigo.

At my other website, What a Feeling!, an Eighties review of Alan Rudolph’s Choose Me, a big indie hit from before they called them indies.

Calendar notice: Sunday, August 21 at 2 p.m., I talk at the Frye Art Museum on “The Anatomy Class: Cinema and the Body,” a look at some filmmakers who use the human form in evocative ways. More info here.